Eat local

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DSC_4283 DSC_4289One of the best ways to get outside at this time of the year is to start your own vegetable garden. It doesn’t have to take a lot of space in your yard but it will take some time and effort to look after it.

I’ve always loved farmers’ markets and the local food available at them so I thought I’d make a film on local eating (which should be finished by the end of the summer). My family has tried before to grow a garden in our yard without much success – mostly because our local wildlife likes our garden as much as we do. But after a lot of care and attention and a really good fence we are now enjoying daily salads and lots of great herbs and even some flowers that add colour to the whole space.

Gardens in general are a great way to bring your community together or in our case our family together, to eat healthy and to connect with nature. A good way to start is with a small herb garden. As for the smaller critters that also love to munch on greens there are lots of natural ways to keep these tiny eating machines away from your foliage.

If you live in an apartment you can grow something small on your patio or inside on a windowsill and then progress from there depending on your success. And did I mention all of it tastes so much better than what you find in the grocery stores. Now I understand why so many restaurants have rooftop gardens – to get the freshest ingredients as possible for their meals.

So next year, we hope to expand our garden, both in size and in the variety of things we plant. Every yard has its limits in what you can grow but every garden, in whatever space, also has it’s own possibilities. It’s up to you to find out what those possibilities are and start experimenting.

 

 

 

Connections

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IMG_5948My friend Lavanya, from Singapore, recently wrote to me asking for answers to some questions. She’s promoting a blogging award called Liebster. Fellow bloggers can nominate each other and nominees can answer questions and then pay it forward by nominating others themselves. It’s kind of like an on-line chain letter that helps introduce new bloggers to others in the process. Thanks for the nomination Lavanya. Here goes…


Q:  What gear do you normally use for photography?

A:  My camera is a Nikon D40 and my filming is done with a Canon Vixia with a dedicated microphone. I’m hoping to get a zoom lens soon so I can stop borrowing my Mom’s all the time.

IMG_6186Q:  What has been your favourite sighting (spotting) of nature?

A:  My favourite sighting was of humpback whales in the Broken Islands on the west coast of B.C. on a kayaking trip. We were lucky enough to come across a male and female when they were mating and I was able to take pictures for nearly 30 minutes.

Q:  Why do you love nature?

A:  I love nature because I grew up with it and have lived in it all my life. It’s part of my history and my childhood and it brings me a lot of calm when my life gets really busy. It’s always waiting to be visited and there’s always something new to discover.

Q:  Where would you want to go most in the world?

DSC_3494A:  I would love to visit Australia, the Seychelles Islands and Alaska would probably be highest on my list.


Q:  Why did you start blogging?

A:  I started blogging because people were often asking about my work and I thought a blog was a great place to have all my information in one place. It’s also a great way to document the things you do and the people you meet. Being able to highlight the works of others is a real advantage as well. It’s just one more way of getting important messages out there to other people who share similar passions for helping the environment.

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Hatchery Update

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Since the Mossom Creek Hatchery was destroyed by fire in December, the community, businesses, schools and tons of individuals have stepped up to help the hatchery and outdoor education centre by donating their time and money to make the rebuild possible. My brother recently made headlines by creating a video on the history of the hatchery and its importance to the local ecosystem. His school raised over $800.00 in a fundraiser that partnered with COBS Bread Suterbrook to sell delicious scones. Check out the full story here. Way to go bro!

Mark your calendars for July 13th for an evening fundraiser gala for the hatchery. Stay tuned for details.

Celebrate Earth Day by Travelling Green

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miranda-mannersWell as usual, there’s been a big gap between blogs. My apologies. Homework has really taken over this year and when I do get any free time I like to get away with my family. Whenever we travel we usually get accommodations with a kitchen which means we have a number of containers that need to be recycled by the end of our visit. These days, more and more hotels have “green” programs that give you the option of declining housekeeping so that your towels aren’t whisked away after just one use and you keep the sheets on your bed for more than one night. It’s a great start but there’s a lot more that needs to be done. Hotels need to provide more recycling options for people to get rid of their waste. If you’re lucky, you might get a “blue bin” garbage type can in your room but I often wonder if they actually recycle the things people leave in there and if they only have recycling for one type of item e.g. glass or tin, and anything else you put in the bin actually winds up in the garbage.

This year when we travelled to a city we had been to before there were a lot more recycling bins and lots of different kinds of bins than I ever remember there being five years ago. And they weren’t just at the hotel we stayed in, they were in more public places than ever before. It was so exciting to know that change was happening. When we visited places and tourist sites without recycling we just carried around the things that could be recycled until we got back to our accommodations at the end of the day.

Whenever we leave a place that we have stayed we usually get follow-up emails asking us to rate our visit and there’s always a chance to make comments about what could be improved on. Our family always comments on the recycling, or maybe I should say, the lack of recycling and we make suggestions for what that could look like in the future and I would encourage you and your family to do the same.

We don’t really care if we get a $5.00 voucher from a hotel (which, by the way, we probably won’t use) as a reward for being “green”.   We’re “green”  because it’s the right thing to do and the least we can do while we’re away. But if that’s what it takes to get people to take action, great. Hopefully, one day, the “green” program will be routine and instead of asking visitors to call the front desk if  they want to decline new linens every day, they’ll have to call, and be charged, to have their sheets cleaned after just one night.

Until then, you can choose a hotel that’s actually green certified from the environmentally friendly bath products it uses to  key card energy control systems that monitor lights and temperature to low flow shower heads and toilets and know that you don’t have to leave your green habits at home.

 

Can YOU make a difference?

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Screen shot 2013-12-14 at 7.18.31 PMOn the evening of December 11th the Mossom Creek Hatchery was destroyed by fire. The hatchery was located in the forest in my neighbourhood for nearly 40 years. I first volunteered there when I was only nine years old. The experiences I enjoyed shaped my attitudes and my actions where the environment is concerned and put me on a path to the person I am today. My very first film was about one of the co-founders of the hatchery, Ruth Foster. She and the hatchery have had a huge influence on my life and I will treasure the memories of my time there caring for thousands of salmon and releasing them into Mossom Creek, not to mention the education I received from Ruth and others on everything from native plants to almost invisible insects that fascinated my brother and I on so many Sunday mornings.  And speaking of my brother, I’ve asked him to add his own perspective to this in the form of a guest blog.

Hi. I first started visiting the hatchery five years ago. I didn’t even realize that for years I had driven past it with my family without even knowing that it was there. It didn’t take long before it became one of my favourite places to visit. It was the kind of place where you could visit with friends, eat some homemade bread and get a hands-on education about stuff that I didn’t even know existed in my own backyard. It felt really good to help. I never minded the work we did while we were there because I knew I was doing it for the salmon and the creatures that live there. Ruth and Rod always made volunteers feel like we were the most important people on earth and they always made time to visit and share stories with each and every person who visited. 

I have visited the hatchery twice since the fire and it was just as sad to see it the second time as it was the first. But I’m starting to realize that it was more than a building and that we haven’t lost the people that were part of it or the reason for it being there. And that reason will always be there. So that’s why everyone needs to help to make rebuilding it possible and to replace all the things that made it a hatchery. In the coming days you can visit the hatchery website and donate to the rebuilding so that more kids like me can have the kind of experiences I had at Mossom Creek.

Please visit the hatchery website at mossomcreek.org to find out how you can help.

Nature Experiences from Around the World

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Over the holidays I connected with someone who lives in Singapore. It seems we share a lot in common. She’s about my age,  she writes a blog and she loves nature and everything to do with the environment. We decided to guest blog for each other – so here she is – thank you Lavanya.

Hello everybody! My name is Lavanya Prakash, and I’m 13 years old. I have a huge passion for nature and photography, just like Miranda and I’ve started my own blog. I live in Singapore, which most people think of as a bustling city- but through my exploration I’ve discovered there are so many wild spaces here! I take photographs of new species of plants, insects, birds and animals that I see in my weekly visits to parks, nature reserves and any green space in Singapore (and Malaysia if I go on vacation).

SONY DSC SONY DSCI was so excited when I found Miranda and her story through her Ted talk. It feels amazing to know that there is someone your age doing almost the same thing, even though in the other side of the world. I don’t have many friends here who know or understand what I’m doing, and when I told that to Miranda- she felt the same way!

I also spoke at TedxYouth@Singapore about “Reconnecting children with nature”- about my experiences in nature and how children can spend more time outdoors. My main concern is that teenagers these days know of terms such as global warming and climate change- but are not able to really grasp the situation. This is because they don’t have a connection with nature so they don’t know what’s out there suffering and being damaged.

SONY DSCI told Miranda a bit about Malaysia, and she was really fascinated by it. Malaysia is truly an amazing place, and has one of the richest biodiversity of flora and fauna in the world. It is filled with different ecosystems- from mangroves, oldest rainforests, tall mountains, beautiful seas and oceans teeming with exotic marine and wildlife- including the rare Sumatran Rhino and Pygmy elephant. But sadly, most of these places are being cut down rapidly in Malaysia because of the growth of palms for palm oil. Whenever we visit Malaysia- we have to drive through acres and acres of oil palm plantations until we reach a natural forest. There are so many creatures that depend on the natural forests and it is saddening to know that their homes are being destroyed. 

SONY DSCThank you so much Miranda for letting me write on your blog! You are a great inspiration to me, and I can’t wait to share more of our ideas together and to the world. This is just the beginning for me, and I really hope to make a change here just like Miranda has in Canada. Please do check out my blog and feel free to leave your comments!

Check our Lavanya’s TEDx talk here.

Explore 150

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In case you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m an outdoors girl. Being outside is my favourite thing to do. I also love history, which is why I probably enjoy social studies at school. So when an app comes along that combines learning about natural, historical and cultural sites in Canada and encourages users to get outdoors and visit those sites, write about those sites and even win some prizes along the way, I’m all over it!

As a member of the Get To Know youth advisory board I was invited to take part in a related board that partnered with Taking It Global to design and pilot a new app called Explore150. Now I certainly didn’t design the app but I have been involved a little along the way to provide feedback, some content and spread the word of its existence. Last month the app launched and I encourage all of you to take a look at it and spread the word too – afterall, that’s what social media does best. It has great graphics that take you all over Canada where you can learn about important sites that help define who we are as Canadians. The great thing about this  app is that it was designed by youth for youth! There’s also a website where you can vote for your favourite sites in Canada.

The app was started because Canada’s 150th birthday is coming up in 2017. It gives kids a chance to learn about Canada and its diversity. Perhaps Abra Rissi, the co-ordinator for Taking It Global says it best.

 …locations vary from historic sites and museums to national parks and community markets. When an Explore150 user visits a location on the app, they are encouraged to check-in to access the peer-generated content on that site. Once checked-in, the user can retrieve information on the site left by their peers and contribute photos or written reflection about their experience at the location. Completing these tasks at Explore150 locations lets users earn points and compete for prizes.

Explore150 users are encouraged to discover new parts of Canada by visiting sites in their community, and can access other parts of Canada by participating dynamically from the comfort of their own home.Screen shot 2013-12-14 at 12.03.41 PM

The app can be downloaded at http://www.explore150.ca